In God’s Eyes

“She gave this name to the Lord who spoke to her: ‘You are the God who sees me’” (Genesis 16:13).

When you looked in the mirror this morning, what did you see? Wrinkles? Gray hair? A tired expression? That’s what I saw. But God doesn’t see me the say way I see myself. All through the Bible, He tells men and women that He sees what no one else does – not even themselves.

Moses saw himself as a stuttering criminal on the lam, but God saw him as the deliverer of His people (Exodus 3:10).

Gideon saw himself as “the least in the weakest clan of Israel,” but God saw him as a “mighty warrior” (Judges 6:15, 12).

David’s father Jesse saw his son as the tender of the family’s sheep, but God saw him as the shepherd-king of His people.

Where the woman with an issue of blood saw herself as ostracized and unclean, Jesus saw her as a “daughter” (Luke 8:48). Simon the Pharisee saw the woman washing Jesus’ feet as a “sinful woman,” but Jesus saw her as a model of love and forgiveness (Luke 7:36-50). Mary Magdalene, whom the whole town knew as a demon-possessed woman Jesus saw as the first witness to His resurrection (John 20:10-18).

And on and on I could go.

God sees you and me far more clearly than we could ever see ourselves.  Who you are in the sight of others, or even in your own eyes, is not who you are in the sight of the God who created and redeemed you.   For those who are in Christ, He sees us as His children (1 John 3:1), with a purpose and a future (Jeremiah 29:11).  Where others see us through the mistakes we’ve made, God sees us with all the potential He placed in us from before we were born.  When we see ourselves through the worldly standards of beauty and success, God sees us through the beauty of His Son and His victory over death.  When we see ourselves as unworthy, hopeless, useless, and unwanted He sees us as valuable, and desired, because He sees us through eyes of love and compassion.

How do you see yourself, Beloved?  When you consider that question, always come back to this truth:  the God who created you sees you as so much more than you can ever imagine.  Ask Him to give you His perspective so you can live as the child of God that you are.

These Gray-Hair Years

I stopped coloring my hair about two years ago. The copper penny red has given way to a silvery-gray and now I look more my age. Why am I talking about my hair color? I’ve been reading and meditating on the Psalms this morning and a few verses have caught my attention.

From Psalm 71: “You have been my hope, O Sovereign Lord, my confidence since my youth” “You have taught me, and to this day I declare Your marvelous deeds” (vs. 5, 17). I grew up in church – most of us southern kids of the sixties did. It was the culture of our time and place. In summer we went to every Vacation Bible School in town. Churches staggered their VBS dates so moms could have some much-needed breaks while we were out of school. I loved it all. And I learned things. Things that have stuck with me to this day. Like how to make a paper-mache globe (“He’s got the whole world in His hands”) and coconut cookies do not taste good dunked in orange Koolaid. And of course, I learned all the Bible stories. And most of all – that Jesus loves me.

But I grew out of Sunday School and VBS. We moved to Germany and church on base was not the same as in my little hometown. I went a few times at first then drifted away. By senior high school, church was a distant memory. In my early adult years, it was not even on my radar. Except for this little faint voice whispering: “Jesus loves me.”

Now I nod my head as I read verses about being old and gray. The psalmist pleads with God not to cast him away and forget him – “till I declare Your power to the next generation, Your might to all who are to come.” So do I. I prayed this morning “I want these silver-haired years to count for Your kingdom Lord. I want to make an impact on this world that will outlive me.” Especially in my granddaughter’s life. Then the Spirit sent me to Psalm 92 and these precious words. “They will still bear fruit in old age . . .” (v. 14). For all of us gray-hairs (even underneath the dye) God is far from done with us. There is a whole world of opportunity for us to serve the Kingdom. Beloved, the next generation needs to know “Jesus loves me.”